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Chart Generator

About Chart Generator: The Chart Generator tool lets you:

Get help with the stock or index chart


The Charts Generator

Enter Stock or Index Symbol(s) with Exchange Code (max. 3): To generate a chart, enter the stock or index symbol followed by a hyphen and an exchange code. You may enter up to three symbols. If you don't specify an exchange code after entering a stock or index symbol, our database will match the symbol with its primary exchange — usually the TSE in Canada or the NYSE or Nasdaq in the United States. For example, if you enter BCE into the text box and click "Chart," the system will return a chart for BCE-T (as traded on the TSE and in Canadian dollars). The exchange codes are as follows: T-Toronto, X-Canadian Venture, N-New York, A-American, -Q (Nasdaq NM), -QS (Nasdaq SC) or -Q2 (OTCBB), I-Index.

If you enter more than one symbol, a comparative chart will be generated. Comparative chart results are based on the percentage price change for the securities or indexes for the Time Period specified. All percentage returns are calculated based on simple capital appreciation. Volume numbers are shown only for the first security or index entered in the "Enter a stock or symbol" text box. Moving averages will not be displayed on comparative charts.

To find a symbol for a company or an index, click the Symbol Lookup button. When you find each symbol, return to the report screen and type or paste the symbol into the appropriate text box.

Compare with an Index: Select an index from the list to generate a comparative chart.

Select a Time Period: The time periods range from intraday to five years. The words in brackets (daily, weekly or monthly) refer to the prices and trading volume that will be displayed on the chart. Daily in brackets indicates that prices and volume will cover one trading day. Weekly or monthly in brackets indicates that prices and volume will span a time period of one week or one month, respectively.

Similarly, daily, weekly or monthly also affect how moving averages will be calculated. Daily in brackets indicates that the moving averages will be calculated on a daily basis. Weekly or monthly in brackets indicates that moving averages will be calculated based on weekly and monthly closing prices, respectively.

Select Chart Style: There are two style options:

Moving Averages

Moving Averages: To use this optional feature, first select the Line Chart style option and type in a symbol and exchange code in the "Enter a stock or index symbol" text box. Please note that moving averages will not be displayed on comparative charts (ie. charts graphing more than one stock or index symbol).

The moving averages on the site are simple moving averages that are calculated daily, weekly or monthly — depending on the Time Period you've selected, such as 1 Year (daily) or 3 Years (weekly).

Moving averages smoothen out the price fluctuations of a security or index by charting its average closing value for as few as 10 days/weeks/months or as many as 200 days/weeks/months. A 10-day moving average, for example, is the average closing price of the security for the past 10 trading days divided by 10, plotted on a chart.

As many as two moving averages can be plotted on the same chart, along with its security or index, enabling investors to discern the price trend. If a stock is trading above its 50-day moving average, then investors are more bullish (positive) about that stock now than they have been, on average, during the last 50 trading days. Similarly, if the stock is trading below its 50-day moving average, then investors are more bearish (negative) about that stock now than they have been, on average, during the last 50 trading days.

Intersection points are also important when viewing moving averages. If a stock crosses its 50-day moving average trending downward, for example, this could be interpreted as a signal to sell. Similarly, if the stock crosses its 50-day moving average trending upward, this could be interpreted as a signal to buy.

Ten-day and 20-day moving averages are considered useful for pinpointing very short-term price trends. Fifty-day averages are considered useful for showing intermediate-term price trends. And 100-day and 200-day moving averages are considered useful for interpreting longer-term price trends.

The stock or index chart:

About the chart: Charts show the price and volume action of a particular security or index over a specified time period. The volume section of each chart displays the daily, weekly or monthly trading volume for the particular security or for the component securities in the index.

During trading hours (weekdays, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.), intraday prices are delayed 15 minutes. Prices for all other periods are updated once per day, after 7 p.m. EST each trading day. All prices are adjusted for stock splits.

Dollars (top left of chart displaying one stock): Prices are in Canadian dollars if the security symbol ends in one of the following exchange codes: -T (Toronto), -X (Canadian Venture). Prices are displayed in U.S. dollars if the security symbol ends in one of these exchange codes: -N (New York), -A (American), -Q (Nasdaq NM), -QS (Nasdaq SC) or -Q2 (OTCBB).

Percent Change: In the case of comparative charts (when two or more securities or indexes are displayed on the same chart) the results are plotted based on the percentage price change for the securities or indexes for the Time Period specified. All percentage returns are calculated based on simple capital appreciation. Volume numbers are shown only for the security or index entered in the first text box in the Chart Generator.

Volume: The volume section of the chart displays the number of shares purchased and sold each trading day for the particular security (and of the constituents of an index) over the calendar year.


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